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  • A Japanese Cloisonne Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s  main image
  • A Japanese Cloisonne Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s  Alternate image
  • A Japanese Cloisonne Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s  Alternate image
  • A Japanese Cloisonne Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s  Alternate image
  • A Japanese Cloisonne Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s  Alternate image

A Japanese Cloisonne Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s

£1,900£950 SN: M3500

A Japanese Cloisonne Black Enamel Vase by Inaba 1990s

With Small Matching Vase Available


Cloisonné enamels in Japan had traditionally been used only as small areas of decoration on architecture and on sword fittings. Around 1833 a former samurai, Kaji Tsunekichi of Nagoya in Owari Province (modern Aichi Prefecture), like many other samurai of that time, was forced to find ways to supplement his meagre official income. It is believed that Kaji obtained a piece of Chinese cloisonné enamel and took it apart, examined how it was made and eventually produced a small cloisonné enamel dish.
From tentative beginnings in Nagoya in the 1830s, by the end of the nineteenth century the art of cloisonné enamelling had expanded to become one of Japan’s most successful forms of manufacture and export.
The peak of artistic and technological sophistication was reached during the years 1880 to 1910, a period often referred to as the ‘Golden Age’ of Japanese cloisonné enamels and superb pieces were made for display at the great world exhibitions of that time as well as for general export.

Height 25.0cm (9.8in) Width 10.0cm (3.9in) Depth 10.0cm (3.9in)
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